Which side do you sleep on?

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Irish Man Steve O’Rouke has caused an international debate about something we haven’t had to question ourselves about, until now.

Talking to The Lift on iRadio, Steve Told us why he tweeted in the first place:

“It was a Friday afternoon and you kind of have these innocuous conversations in work that you kind of find out a bit more about people ’cause people are kind of winding down. And we were having a conversation about tidying the house and stuff like that.

“Someone was saying they only made their side of the bed when they were getting up in the morning. And It just … twigged with me, because it sounded a bit odd. 

“I said, ‘What do you mean your side of the bed? Like you don’t have a set side of the bed, just get in wherever you get in.’

“A couple of my colleagues just looked at me as if I had said something truly horrific and their reaction was so strange that I took to Twitter and I took out the question cause I wanted to make sure that like they were the people in the wrong or the weirdos as it turned out.

“The response was swift and brutal that’s all I can say, the best way of putting it in terms of yeah, out of the vast, vast majority of people, it turns out, do have a set side of the bed and it’s my wife and me who are the odd ones out.

 

People could not accept this weirdness

Too-Self Conscious?

Asked about his thoughts on going to bed now without a side Steve told The Lift on iRadio : 

“Friday night and Saturday night, it was really conscious about oh like, “Is this the same side as last night or different?” And that was the first time I’d ever thought about it. It did make me a little bit self-conscious. But by Sunday, it was just like, ah, we’ve fallen back into our non-routine again and it was grand.”

Confused and Bemused

“Like I should say my wife has found this whole thing extremely surreal because she’s not on social media at all.

“She’s actually quite a private person in that sense. And I would rarely even mention her by name on Twitter. I’d usually just refer to her as my wife or whatever rather than by her first name, Amy. And so she’s listening to all these interviews or … And having all these conversations with people and going, “Why do people care so much?” But I think it’s what you said there though, it’s let people … And as I said, it certainly wasn’t the intention, but it’s let people kind of question, “But why do I do that?”

“Maybe that’s no harm. Maybe that’s a good thing that people are thinking to themselves, “Well why am a creature of habit?” Because … And the response that a lot of them … Does seem to be that like, “Well, do you know what, you’ve enough decisions to take in a day, so if you can automate as much of your day as possible, maybe that’s a good thing as well.”